Happiness is like a butterfly; the more you chase it, the more it will elude you, but if you turn your attention to other things, it will come and sit softly on your shoulder...

One of the first things they ask you in the ER is to rate your pain on a scale from 1 to 10. I’ve been asked this question hundreds of times and… I remember once, when I couldn’t catch my breath and I felt like my chest was on fire. The nurse asked me to rate the pain, though I couldn’t speak I held up nine fingers. Later, when I start to feeling better, the nurse came in and she called me a fighter. "You know how I know?" she said, "you called a 10 a 9." But that wasn’t the truth. I didn’t called it a 9 ‘cause I was brave. The reason I called it a 9 was because I was saving my 10.

And this was it. This was the great and terrible 10. 

cinnasghost:

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone Original Book + J. K. Rowling’s Notes

lights will guide you home

things every highschooler should know

slangwang:

  • slut shaming doesnt make you cool
  • literally no one cares if you smoke weed every day
  • literally no one
  • do not be afraid to make eye contact with people in the hallway
  • thank the people who serve you lunch
  • say hello to the janitors
  • appreciate your parents
  • establish good friendships with teachers who care the most
  • it wont make you a teacher’s pet so stfu
  • stop spending so much time on the computer if you want better grades and more sleep

get to know me meme (royalist edition) || (02/10) tiaras: The Poltimore Tiara

Made by Garrard for Florence, Lady Poltimore, in the 1870’s, this astonishing tiara was purchased for £5,500 at an auction in 1959 by either Queen Elizabeth II or Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother – acquired as a wedding gift for Princess Margaret in connection with her wedding to Antony Armstrong-Jones (later Earl of Snowdon) in 1960. It was one of Margaret’s favourite tiaras and its splendour perfectly suited her personality greatly. The magnificent tiara consists of all-diamonds set in gold and silver and has a diameter of 19.2 centimetres. It is a convertible piece of jewellery that can be broken down into a necklace and eleven brooches. After Margaret’s death in 2002, it met a grim fate (as seen with the eyes of a royalist) when it was auctioned off at Christie’s in 2006 by her children Viscount Linley and Lady Sarah Chatto for a staggering £926,400 (the value had originally been estimated at £150,000–£200,000) due to its provenance. The sale of the tiara reportedly caused a row between Viscount Linley and his father, Lord Snowdon, because Lord Snowdon was opposed selling out of his late ex-wife’s jewellery. It is currently unknown as to whether its new owners remember to give it a spin in the bathtub from time to time.
get to know me meme (royalist edition) || (02/10) tiaras: The Poltimore Tiara

Made by Garrard for Florence, Lady Poltimore, in the 1870’s, this astonishing tiara was purchased for £5,500 at an auction in 1959 by either Queen Elizabeth II or Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother – acquired as a wedding gift for Princess Margaret in connection with her wedding to Antony Armstrong-Jones (later Earl of Snowdon) in 1960. It was one of Margaret’s favourite tiaras and its splendour perfectly suited her personality greatly. The magnificent tiara consists of all-diamonds set in gold and silver and has a diameter of 19.2 centimetres. It is a convertible piece of jewellery that can be broken down into a necklace and eleven brooches. After Margaret’s death in 2002, it met a grim fate (as seen with the eyes of a royalist) when it was auctioned off at Christie’s in 2006 by her children Viscount Linley and Lady Sarah Chatto for a staggering £926,400 (the value had originally been estimated at £150,000–£200,000) due to its provenance. The sale of the tiara reportedly caused a row between Viscount Linley and his father, Lord Snowdon, because Lord Snowdon was opposed selling out of his late ex-wife’s jewellery. It is currently unknown as to whether its new owners remember to give it a spin in the bathtub from time to time.

claudemonet-art:

River Thawing near Vetheuil, 1880
Claude Monet

claudemonet-art:

River Thawing near Vetheuil, 1880

Claude Monet

As much as someone can tell you things, you have to go out there and make your own mistakes in order to learn.